Thursday, 28 March 2019

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck


“Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck is the kind of book that fills you with hope, makes it stay for a while and then reveals the true nature of men and the world we live in.

George and Lennie are two itinerant ranch hands who arrive in California's Salinas Valley during the Great Depression, after being run off from their last assignment up north. Lennie possesses great physical strength but has the intellectual capacity of a child. George is the more calculating of the pair, but even he gets caught up in Lennie's dreams of owning a farm.

The book is great because, not only the great use of description but the characters because Steinbeck shows how children are, in some cases, better people than adults in the way that they do not judge people because they do not see people or things from that point of view.

Another great thing about  is that it shows some of the other characters' feelings about the situations they are being put in and shows how Steinbeck feels about racism and sexism. Yet another good thing about this book is that it is not long and does not drag on (like other great books as The Great Gatsby and To Kill A Mockingbird) which is great for readers who do not like to read long books and get bored when reading long books.

Of Mice and Men is justifiably considered a classic of American literature: a short, direct meditation on friendship, loneliness, and unfulfilled dreams in trying times. Its plot and prose are straightforward and unadorned, but the impact of the final chapters is unforgettable. Lennie and George are iconic characters, and Steinbeck's presentation of their interactions with the hands at the Salinas ranch is pitch-perfect.

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